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economy slows down, u.s. exports may follow suit. hurricane sandy showed up in the latest report on jobless claims, making them artificially low. initial claims for unemployment benefits dropped by 8,000 to a seasonally adjusted 355,000 at the end of last week. the number is expected to be revised higher as more data is collected. the labor department says one state filed fewer claims because of power outages, while the storm boosted claims in other states where more people looking for relief. later in the program, we'll look at sandy's impact on retailers. >> tom: the biggest bank in america has the okay now from uncle sam to pay back shareholders. jpmorgan will be allowed to restart a stock buyback plan early next year. like all systemically important banks jpmorgan has to get regulatory approval to change its dividend or stock-repurchase plan. the regulators want banks to have enough financial firepower to withstand troubled times before the banks will spend money on share holders. jpmorgan's buyback strategy was suspended this year after it lost $6 billion when a derivative t
benefits jumped to a one-and-a-half year high, surging 78,000, thanks to super- storm sandy. the total was 439,000. meantime, consumer inflation slowed to a one tenth of a percent increase, thanks to lower energy prices. without food and energy, core inflation was up two tenths of a percent. on wall street, the dow fell 28.5 points, the nasdaq was down almost ten, and the s&p 500 dropped two. if you want to know how the economy is faring, it pays to keep an eye on walmart. after all, it has over 10,000 stores across the globe, selling more than $1 billion worth of stuff every day. it earned $1.08 per share in the third quarter, a penny more than estimates, and up 11% from last year. but revenues were a little shy of forecast, and walmart's outlook for this quarter was less than anticipated. compare that to rival target's quarterly earnings-- four cents better than expectations at 81 cents a share and a holiday outlook that didn't disappoint. erika miller reports on what the results say about all-important the holiday season. >> reporter: $3.6 billion. that almost unthinkable number is
spiking because of hurricane sandy. that's welcome relief to many drivers, but it still costs more to fill up your tank now compared to a year ago. erika miller reports from one of the most expensive cities to fill 'er up. >> reporter: here in new york city, the long lines and gas rationing are finally gone, but there's more good news. like the rest of the nation, gas is actually cheaper now than before superstorm sandy. a month ago, superstorm sandy shut down refineries in the northeast, delayed oil shipments and left many gasoline stations without power. in some hard hit areas, prices spiked more than ten cents a gallon. but now, the situation has drastically improved here and around the country. regular unleaded costs an average of $3.42 nationwide. that's 12 cents below where it was a month ago. but drivers are still paying about 12 cents more for gas today than a year ago. a big reason is escalating middle east tensions. >> anytime you have that kind of conflict in the middle east, whether it's the israelis or the egyptians, the syrians, it really the disruption of flow, you know. any
spending and stronger u.s. exports also helped. the impact super-storm sandy has had on the job market seems to be dissipating. 23,000 fewer americans filed for first-time unemployment benefits during thanksgiving week compared to a week earlier. the total was 393,000. it had jumped to over 400,000 in the weeks following the storm. still, we saw just modest gains on wall street today-- the dow rose 36 points, the nasdaq was up 20, and the s&p 500 added six. >> tom: the roster of companies announcing special one-time paydays for their shareholders continued growing today. taxes on stock dividends are currently set at 15%. but with no deal on the fiscal cliff, dividends will be taxed like regular income, meaning they could go up to over 40% for some high-income households. we spoke with larry mendelson, the chairman and c.e.o. at avionics gear maker heico, which announced its own special dividend this week. larry, thank you for joining us, we appreciate it. what role did the fiscal cliff play in heico decision to paid fiscal dividend. >> i think the fiscal cliff was very important. and m
and other supplies thanks to super-storm sandy in the northeast. shares jumped to a new 52 week high. volume more than doubled with the stock up 6.2%. one tax set to go up in january is the tax on stock dividends. wal-mart today had an early gift for its shareholders. it moved up the payment of its fourth quarter dividend. walmart will pay out $39.75 per share on december 27. it had been scheduled to go out january second. under current law the tax on common dividends could go from 15% to as high as 43% for some shareholders. shares were up 1.5% on heavier than usual volume. j.p. morgan gained 2.8% before announcing a new chief financial officer late today. marianne lake currently is the chief financial officer at the bank's consumer business. the management shake-up comes after the bank's $6 billion derivatives trading loss this spring. just ahead of thanksgiving, the country's biggest meat producer tyson foods saw the impact of this summer's midwestern drought. dry conditions led to higher animal feed costs, leading to less meat supply, helping tyson raise prices. bottom line for the quart
claims fell by 41,000 as the impact of super- storm sandy on the job market began to ease. still, new claims remain over 400,000 thanks to the storm. on wall street: the dow closed up 48 points, the nasdaq added almost 10, and the s&p 500 finished higher by three. >> susie: stocks also rose on news of a ceasefire in the fighting between hamas and israel in the gaza strip. the announcement came after a week of rocket attacks and counter-attacks that has killed an estimated 150 people. most of the dead are palestinians. and just before that agreement to end hostilities, a bomb exploded in a tel aviv bus station injuring 27. >> tom: i don't wake up trying to solve for wall street, i wake up trying to solve for our members and customers each and every day. still ahead, we talk health care reform with florida's largest health insurer, chairman and c.e.o. of florida blue, patrick gerahty joins us. >> tom: among the taxes scheduled to go up on new year's day if there is no solution to the fiscal cliff are taxes on dividends and capital gains. 403 of the 500 companies in the s&p 500 stock ind
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6